Branches From the “SEAD”: Sustained and Feasible Expansion of the Surgical Exploration and Discovery (SEAD) Program

Nada Gawad, Linden K. Head, Connor McGuire, Antonio Gangemi, Katie Garland, Kimia Sorouri, Alexander Lachapelle, James T. Rutka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Problem: A predicted shortage of surgeons and attrition among surgical residents has highlighted the need to attract well-suited medical students to surgical specialties. Literature suggests that early exposure may increase interest by addressing misconceptions and allowing students more time to make an informed career decision. Approach: The Surgical Exploration and Discovery (SEAD) program was created in 2012 with the goal of providing medical students with comprehensive and multifaceted exposure to surgical specialties to develop their knowledge and skills, and in turn positively influence their interest in pursuing a surgical career. The purpose of this innovation report is to describe the challenges, successes, and evolution of the SEAD program. Outcomes: Since its inception, SEAD has expanded to include 5 North American institutions and has educated nearly 400 participants in 5 y. Through a replication strategy, SEAD has maintained its basic curriculum, while accommodating the constraints and innovative approaches unique to each institution. Short-term results have demonstrated improved knowledge of curricular objectives, student perception of significant value of the program, and the generation of interest in a career in surgery. Conclusions: Future directions include the evaluation of long-term impact on pursuing a career in surgery and continuing further expansion using the current replication model, while maintaining a high-quality surgical education program.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages315-321
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume235
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2019

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Surgical Specialties
Medical Students
Students
Curriculum
Education
Direction compound
Surgeons

Keywords

  • Medical students
  • Observerships
  • Simulation
  • Surgical education
  • Surgical exposure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Branches From the “SEAD” : Sustained and Feasible Expansion of the Surgical Exploration and Discovery (SEAD) Program. / Gawad, Nada; Head, Linden K.; McGuire, Connor; Gangemi, Antonio; Garland, Katie; Sorouri, Kimia; Lachapelle, Alexander; Rutka, James T.

In: Journal of Surgical Research, Vol. 235, 01.03.2019, p. 315-321.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gawad, Nada ; Head, Linden K. ; McGuire, Connor ; Gangemi, Antonio ; Garland, Katie ; Sorouri, Kimia ; Lachapelle, Alexander ; Rutka, James T. / Branches From the “SEAD” : Sustained and Feasible Expansion of the Surgical Exploration and Discovery (SEAD) Program. In: Journal of Surgical Research. 2019 ; Vol. 235. pp. 315-321.
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