Designing visible engineering: Supporting tinkering performances in museums

Leilah Lyons, Michael Tissenbaum, Matthew Berland, Rebecca Eydt, Lauren Wielgus, Adam Mechtley

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    • 5 Citations

    Abstract

    Interactive technologies like multi-touch tables enable museum exhibit designers to support visitors' learning with a wide range of resources (from multimedia to dynamic feedback to the presence of other visitors). Designers must decide, though, how best to align the affordances of these resources with the learning activities they are trying to support [23]. This work examines a multi-touch table exhibit designed to support an activity, tinkering, which has been identified as a form of interaction that may offer special benefits to novices learning about engineering [e.g., 4]. When a learner is tinkering, he or she is engaged in a process of iterative adjustment to a constructed artifact, making use of "just in time" resources and feedback to guide the next steps in their exploration of the problem space. The exhibit studied in this work provided several resources for supporting tinkering, and this paper presents a detailed case showing how these different resources (some technical, some social, and some sociotechnical) were or were not used by learners. A key design goal we identified was the need to transform the tacit engineering practices of visitors into visible engineering performances, such that those performances could serve as "cultural tools" [35] for mediating the learning of other visitors. Copyright is held by the owner/author(s).

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publicationProceedings of IDC 2015: The 14th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children
    PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery, Inc
    Pages49-58
    Number of pages10
    ISBN (Print)9781450335904
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jun 21 2015
    Event14th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children, IDC 2015 - Boston, United States

    Other

    Other14th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children, IDC 2015
    CountryUnited States
    CityBoston
    Period6/21/156/24/15

    Fingerprint

    resources
    Museums
    Learning
    visitor
    engineering
    learning
    performance
    Touch
    Feedback
    museum
    feedback
    activity
    Social Adjustment
    Space Flight
    Multimedia
    Artifacts
    Technology
    just-in-time production
    multimedia
    copyright

    Keywords

    • Engineering education
    • Exhibit design
    • Informal learning
    • Multi-touch tabletops
    • Museums

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Human-Computer Interaction
    • Developmental and Educational Psychology
    • Education
    • Software

    Cite this

    Lyons, L., Tissenbaum, M., Berland, M., Eydt, R., Wielgus, L., & Mechtley, A. (2015). Designing visible engineering: Supporting tinkering performances in museums. In Proceedings of IDC 2015: The 14th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children (pp. 49-58). [2771845] Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. DOI: 10.1145/2771839.2771845

    Designing visible engineering : Supporting tinkering performances in museums. / Lyons, Leilah; Tissenbaum, Michael; Berland, Matthew; Eydt, Rebecca; Wielgus, Lauren; Mechtley, Adam.

    Proceedings of IDC 2015: The 14th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, 2015. p. 49-58 2771845.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Lyons, L, Tissenbaum, M, Berland, M, Eydt, R, Wielgus, L & Mechtley, A 2015, Designing visible engineering: Supporting tinkering performances in museums. in Proceedings of IDC 2015: The 14th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children., 2771845, Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, pp. 49-58, 14th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children, IDC 2015, Boston, United States, 21-24 June. DOI: 10.1145/2771839.2771845
    Lyons L, Tissenbaum M, Berland M, Eydt R, Wielgus L, Mechtley A. Designing visible engineering: Supporting tinkering performances in museums. In Proceedings of IDC 2015: The 14th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. 2015. p. 49-58. 2771845. Available from, DOI: 10.1145/2771839.2771845

    Lyons, Leilah; Tissenbaum, Michael; Berland, Matthew; Eydt, Rebecca; Wielgus, Lauren; Mechtley, Adam / Designing visible engineering : Supporting tinkering performances in museums.

    Proceedings of IDC 2015: The 14th International Conference on Interaction Design and Children. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, 2015. p. 49-58 2771845.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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