Foreclosures and weight gain: Differential associations by longer neighborhood exposure

Ana Clara Duran, Shannon N. Zenk, Elizabeth Tarlov, Sarah Duda, Geoff Smith, Jin Man Lee, Michael L. Berbaum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

While home foreclosure can lead to mental and physical health declines in persons experiencing the foreclosure, whether neighborhood foreclosures can affect the health of other residents is debatable. Using a racially/ethnically diverse sample of Chicago metropolitan area residents linked to foreclosure data from 2008 to 2014, we assessed whether exposure to neighborhood foreclosure fillings was associated with changes in objectively measured body mass index (BMI) over time. Using a retrospective longitudinal design, we employed fixed-effects regression models that controlled for individual- and neighborhood-level covariates to test the association of neighborhood foreclosures and BMI in >60,000 individuals and for individuals who did not move during the follow-up period. We also adjusted for the non-linear association of age and BMI and comorbidities and employed a series of sensitivity analysis to test for robustness. In fully adjusted models, a standard-deviation increase in neighborhood foreclosure filings within 500 m was associated with increases in BMI for individuals who did not move (nonmovers) (mean = 0.03 BMI units, 95% confidence interval: 0.01, 0.06). Neighborhood foreclosure rates were not associated with changes in BMI for the full sample. Given the potential deleterious effects of neighborhood foreclosure on individuals with longer exposure to the local vicinity, clarifying the potential health effects of neighborhood foreclosures would help policymakers when planning actions to prevent home losses, predatory home loans, and that aim to more efficiently return foreclosure properties to productive uses.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages23-29
Number of pages7
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume118
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Weight Gain
Body Mass Index
Health
Comorbidity
Mental Health
Confidence Intervals

Keywords

  • Body mass index
  • Factors
  • Housing
  • Neighborhood
  • Obesity
  • Socioeconomic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Foreclosures and weight gain : Differential associations by longer neighborhood exposure. / Duran, Ana Clara; Zenk, Shannon N.; Tarlov, Elizabeth; Duda, Sarah; Smith, Geoff; Lee, Jin Man; Berbaum, Michael L.

In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 118, 01.01.2019, p. 23-29.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{2f4639468c43486da0068ca3109b2d66,
title = "Foreclosures and weight gain: Differential associations by longer neighborhood exposure",
abstract = "While home foreclosure can lead to mental and physical health declines in persons experiencing the foreclosure, whether neighborhood foreclosures can affect the health of other residents is debatable. Using a racially/ethnically diverse sample of Chicago metropolitan area residents linked to foreclosure data from 2008 to 2014, we assessed whether exposure to neighborhood foreclosure fillings was associated with changes in objectively measured body mass index (BMI) over time. Using a retrospective longitudinal design, we employed fixed-effects regression models that controlled for individual- and neighborhood-level covariates to test the association of neighborhood foreclosures and BMI in >60,000 individuals and for individuals who did not move during the follow-up period. We also adjusted for the non-linear association of age and BMI and comorbidities and employed a series of sensitivity analysis to test for robustness. In fully adjusted models, a standard-deviation increase in neighborhood foreclosure filings within 500 m was associated with increases in BMI for individuals who did not move (nonmovers) (mean = 0.03 BMI units, 95{\%} confidence interval: 0.01, 0.06). Neighborhood foreclosure rates were not associated with changes in BMI for the full sample. Given the potential deleterious effects of neighborhood foreclosure on individuals with longer exposure to the local vicinity, clarifying the potential health effects of neighborhood foreclosures would help policymakers when planning actions to prevent home losses, predatory home loans, and that aim to more efficiently return foreclosure properties to productive uses.",
keywords = "Body mass index, Factors, Housing, Neighborhood, Obesity, Socioeconomic",
author = "Duran, {Ana Clara} and Zenk, {Shannon N.} and Elizabeth Tarlov and Sarah Duda and Geoff Smith and Lee, {Jin Man} and Berbaum, {Michael L.}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ypmed.2018.07.009",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "118",
pages = "23--29",
journal = "Preventive Medicine",
issn = "0091-7435",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Foreclosures and weight gain

T2 - Preventive Medicine

AU - Duran, Ana Clara

AU - Zenk, Shannon N.

AU - Tarlov, Elizabeth

AU - Duda, Sarah

AU - Smith, Geoff

AU - Lee, Jin Man

AU - Berbaum, Michael L.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - While home foreclosure can lead to mental and physical health declines in persons experiencing the foreclosure, whether neighborhood foreclosures can affect the health of other residents is debatable. Using a racially/ethnically diverse sample of Chicago metropolitan area residents linked to foreclosure data from 2008 to 2014, we assessed whether exposure to neighborhood foreclosure fillings was associated with changes in objectively measured body mass index (BMI) over time. Using a retrospective longitudinal design, we employed fixed-effects regression models that controlled for individual- and neighborhood-level covariates to test the association of neighborhood foreclosures and BMI in >60,000 individuals and for individuals who did not move during the follow-up period. We also adjusted for the non-linear association of age and BMI and comorbidities and employed a series of sensitivity analysis to test for robustness. In fully adjusted models, a standard-deviation increase in neighborhood foreclosure filings within 500 m was associated with increases in BMI for individuals who did not move (nonmovers) (mean = 0.03 BMI units, 95% confidence interval: 0.01, 0.06). Neighborhood foreclosure rates were not associated with changes in BMI for the full sample. Given the potential deleterious effects of neighborhood foreclosure on individuals with longer exposure to the local vicinity, clarifying the potential health effects of neighborhood foreclosures would help policymakers when planning actions to prevent home losses, predatory home loans, and that aim to more efficiently return foreclosure properties to productive uses.

AB - While home foreclosure can lead to mental and physical health declines in persons experiencing the foreclosure, whether neighborhood foreclosures can affect the health of other residents is debatable. Using a racially/ethnically diverse sample of Chicago metropolitan area residents linked to foreclosure data from 2008 to 2014, we assessed whether exposure to neighborhood foreclosure fillings was associated with changes in objectively measured body mass index (BMI) over time. Using a retrospective longitudinal design, we employed fixed-effects regression models that controlled for individual- and neighborhood-level covariates to test the association of neighborhood foreclosures and BMI in >60,000 individuals and for individuals who did not move during the follow-up period. We also adjusted for the non-linear association of age and BMI and comorbidities and employed a series of sensitivity analysis to test for robustness. In fully adjusted models, a standard-deviation increase in neighborhood foreclosure filings within 500 m was associated with increases in BMI for individuals who did not move (nonmovers) (mean = 0.03 BMI units, 95% confidence interval: 0.01, 0.06). Neighborhood foreclosure rates were not associated with changes in BMI for the full sample. Given the potential deleterious effects of neighborhood foreclosure on individuals with longer exposure to the local vicinity, clarifying the potential health effects of neighborhood foreclosures would help policymakers when planning actions to prevent home losses, predatory home loans, and that aim to more efficiently return foreclosure properties to productive uses.

KW - Body mass index

KW - Factors

KW - Housing

KW - Neighborhood

KW - Obesity

KW - Socioeconomic

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85054597214&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85054597214&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ypmed.2018.07.009

DO - 10.1016/j.ypmed.2018.07.009

M3 - Article

VL - 118

SP - 23

EP - 29

JO - Preventive Medicine

JF - Preventive Medicine

SN - 0091-7435

ER -