Large-river dominated black carbon flux and budget: A case study of the estuarine-inner shelf of East China Sea, China

Yin Fang, Yingjun Chen, Limin Hu, Chongguo Tian, Yongming Luo, Jun Li, Gan Zhang, Mei Zheng, Tian Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Mobilization of terrestrial-derived and recalcitrant black carbon (BC), including char and soot, from land to ocean exerts a significant influence on the global carbon cycle. This study elaborated the occurrence and spatial distributions of BC, char, and soot concentrations, as well as their burial fluxes, in the estuarine-inner shelf surface sediments of the East China Sea (ECS), an epicontinental sea adjacent to Chinese high-intensity BC emission source regions. Using a combination of BC measurements in the Yangtze River water and coastal ECS aerosol samples, a preliminary BC budget was concurrently constrained. The spatial distribution of char concentrations resembled largely that of BC, but differed significantly from that of soot, indicating that char and soot exhibited different geochemical behaviors. In contrast to concentrations, BC, char, and soot burial fluxes exhibited highly consistent spatial patterns, and all declined as the distance from the coastline increased. For the coastal ECS, riverine discharge dominated (~92%) the total BC input, with the Yangtze River alone accounting for as high as ~72%. The area-integrated sedimentary BC sink flux (630 ± 728 Gg/yr) in the coastal ECS was equivalent to the total BC influx (670 ± 153 Gg/yr), which coincided well with the regional sediment budget. This suggested that the terrestrial-derived and recalcitrant BC could be regarded as an alternative geochemical proxy for tracing the sediment source-to-sink processes in this region. Comparisons between BC and co-generated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) budgets in the coastal ECS revealed similarities in their input pathways, but dramatic differences in their ultimate fates. Despite these, the ECS estuarine-inner shelf could serve as a major sink of these terrestrial-based materials in the global ocean.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages2489-2496
Number of pages8
JournalScience of the Total Environment
Volume651
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 15 2019

Fingerprint

Soot
Geochemistry
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons
carbon budget
Estuaries
carbon flux
black carbon
Carbon black
Spatial distribution
Dust
Sediments
Rivers
Fluxes
river
soot
sea
spatial distribution
sediment budget
inland sea
carbon sink

Keywords

  • Black carbon
  • Carbon cycle
  • East China Sea
  • Riverine discharge
  • Yangtze River

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Pollution

Cite this

Large-river dominated black carbon flux and budget : A case study of the estuarine-inner shelf of East China Sea, China. / Fang, Yin; Chen, Yingjun; Hu, Limin; Tian, Chongguo; Luo, Yongming; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan; Zheng, Mei; Lin, Tian.

In: Science of the Total Environment, Vol. 651, 15.02.2019, p. 2489-2496.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fang, Yin ; Chen, Yingjun ; Hu, Limin ; Tian, Chongguo ; Luo, Yongming ; Li, Jun ; Zhang, Gan ; Zheng, Mei ; Lin, Tian. / Large-river dominated black carbon flux and budget : A case study of the estuarine-inner shelf of East China Sea, China. In: Science of the Total Environment. 2019 ; Vol. 651. pp. 2489-2496.
@article{f2dc131cb6644d0294718076a5208631,
title = "Large-river dominated black carbon flux and budget: A case study of the estuarine-inner shelf of East China Sea, China",
abstract = "Mobilization of terrestrial-derived and recalcitrant black carbon (BC), including char and soot, from land to ocean exerts a significant influence on the global carbon cycle. This study elaborated the occurrence and spatial distributions of BC, char, and soot concentrations, as well as their burial fluxes, in the estuarine-inner shelf surface sediments of the East China Sea (ECS), an epicontinental sea adjacent to Chinese high-intensity BC emission source regions. Using a combination of BC measurements in the Yangtze River water and coastal ECS aerosol samples, a preliminary BC budget was concurrently constrained. The spatial distribution of char concentrations resembled largely that of BC, but differed significantly from that of soot, indicating that char and soot exhibited different geochemical behaviors. In contrast to concentrations, BC, char, and soot burial fluxes exhibited highly consistent spatial patterns, and all declined as the distance from the coastline increased. For the coastal ECS, riverine discharge dominated (~92{\%}) the total BC input, with the Yangtze River alone accounting for as high as ~72{\%}. The area-integrated sedimentary BC sink flux (630 ± 728 Gg/yr) in the coastal ECS was equivalent to the total BC influx (670 ± 153 Gg/yr), which coincided well with the regional sediment budget. This suggested that the terrestrial-derived and recalcitrant BC could be regarded as an alternative geochemical proxy for tracing the sediment source-to-sink processes in this region. Comparisons between BC and co-generated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) budgets in the coastal ECS revealed similarities in their input pathways, but dramatic differences in their ultimate fates. Despite these, the ECS estuarine-inner shelf could serve as a major sink of these terrestrial-based materials in the global ocean.",
keywords = "Black carbon, Carbon cycle, East China Sea, Riverine discharge, Yangtze River",
author = "Yin Fang and Yingjun Chen and Limin Hu and Chongguo Tian and Yongming Luo and Jun Li and Gan Zhang and Mei Zheng and Tian Lin",
year = "2019",
month = "2",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.10.156",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "651",
pages = "2489--2496",
journal = "Science of the Total Environment",
issn = "0048-9697",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Large-river dominated black carbon flux and budget

T2 - Science of the Total Environment

AU - Fang, Yin

AU - Chen, Yingjun

AU - Hu, Limin

AU - Tian, Chongguo

AU - Luo, Yongming

AU - Li, Jun

AU - Zhang, Gan

AU - Zheng, Mei

AU - Lin, Tian

PY - 2019/2/15

Y1 - 2019/2/15

N2 - Mobilization of terrestrial-derived and recalcitrant black carbon (BC), including char and soot, from land to ocean exerts a significant influence on the global carbon cycle. This study elaborated the occurrence and spatial distributions of BC, char, and soot concentrations, as well as their burial fluxes, in the estuarine-inner shelf surface sediments of the East China Sea (ECS), an epicontinental sea adjacent to Chinese high-intensity BC emission source regions. Using a combination of BC measurements in the Yangtze River water and coastal ECS aerosol samples, a preliminary BC budget was concurrently constrained. The spatial distribution of char concentrations resembled largely that of BC, but differed significantly from that of soot, indicating that char and soot exhibited different geochemical behaviors. In contrast to concentrations, BC, char, and soot burial fluxes exhibited highly consistent spatial patterns, and all declined as the distance from the coastline increased. For the coastal ECS, riverine discharge dominated (~92%) the total BC input, with the Yangtze River alone accounting for as high as ~72%. The area-integrated sedimentary BC sink flux (630 ± 728 Gg/yr) in the coastal ECS was equivalent to the total BC influx (670 ± 153 Gg/yr), which coincided well with the regional sediment budget. This suggested that the terrestrial-derived and recalcitrant BC could be regarded as an alternative geochemical proxy for tracing the sediment source-to-sink processes in this region. Comparisons between BC and co-generated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) budgets in the coastal ECS revealed similarities in their input pathways, but dramatic differences in their ultimate fates. Despite these, the ECS estuarine-inner shelf could serve as a major sink of these terrestrial-based materials in the global ocean.

AB - Mobilization of terrestrial-derived and recalcitrant black carbon (BC), including char and soot, from land to ocean exerts a significant influence on the global carbon cycle. This study elaborated the occurrence and spatial distributions of BC, char, and soot concentrations, as well as their burial fluxes, in the estuarine-inner shelf surface sediments of the East China Sea (ECS), an epicontinental sea adjacent to Chinese high-intensity BC emission source regions. Using a combination of BC measurements in the Yangtze River water and coastal ECS aerosol samples, a preliminary BC budget was concurrently constrained. The spatial distribution of char concentrations resembled largely that of BC, but differed significantly from that of soot, indicating that char and soot exhibited different geochemical behaviors. In contrast to concentrations, BC, char, and soot burial fluxes exhibited highly consistent spatial patterns, and all declined as the distance from the coastline increased. For the coastal ECS, riverine discharge dominated (~92%) the total BC input, with the Yangtze River alone accounting for as high as ~72%. The area-integrated sedimentary BC sink flux (630 ± 728 Gg/yr) in the coastal ECS was equivalent to the total BC influx (670 ± 153 Gg/yr), which coincided well with the regional sediment budget. This suggested that the terrestrial-derived and recalcitrant BC could be regarded as an alternative geochemical proxy for tracing the sediment source-to-sink processes in this region. Comparisons between BC and co-generated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) budgets in the coastal ECS revealed similarities in their input pathways, but dramatic differences in their ultimate fates. Despite these, the ECS estuarine-inner shelf could serve as a major sink of these terrestrial-based materials in the global ocean.

KW - Black carbon

KW - Carbon cycle

KW - East China Sea

KW - Riverine discharge

KW - Yangtze River

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85054848863&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85054848863&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.10.156

DO - 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.10.156

M3 - Article

VL - 651

SP - 2489

EP - 2496

JO - Science of the Total Environment

JF - Science of the Total Environment

SN - 0048-9697

ER -