Recent trends in american board of psychiatry and neurology psychiatric subspecialties

Larry R. Faulkner, Dorthea Juul, Naleen N. Andrade, Beth Ann Brooks, Christopher C. Colenda, Robert W. Guynn, David A. Mrazek, Victor I. Reus, Barbara S. Schneidman, Kailie R. Shaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objective: This article reviews the current status and recent trends in the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN) psychiatric subspecialties and discusses the implications of those trends as well as several key questions whose answers may well determine subspecialty viability. Methods: Data are presented on specialty and subspecialty programs; graduates; and ABPN certification candidates and diplomates drawn from several sources, including the records of the ABPN, the websites of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and the American Medical Association, and the annual medical education issues of JAMA. Results: Fewer than half of psychiatry graduates pursue subspecialty training. While most recent specialty graduates attempt to become certified by the ABPN, many subspecialists elect not to do so. There have been recent decreases in the number of fellowship programs and trainees in geriatric psychiatry and addiction psychiatry. The pass rates for fellowship graduates are superior to those for the "grandfathers" in all of the newer psychiatric subspecialties. Lower percentages of subspecialists than specialists participate in maintenance of certification, and maintenance of certification pass rates are high. Conclusion: The initial interest in training and certification in some of the ABPN subspecialties appears to have slowed, and the long-term viability of those subspecialties may well depend on the answers to a number of complicated social, economic, and political questions in the new health care era. © 2011 Academic Psychiatry.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)35-39
Number of pages5
JournalAcademic Psychiatry
Volume35
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

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psychiatry
Neurology
Psychiatry
neurology
graduate
certification
Certification
trend
maintenance
training
program
education
medical association
geriatrics
accreditation
trainee
addiction
website
specialist
superior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Education
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Faulkner, L. R., Juul, D., Andrade, N. N., Brooks, B. A., Colenda, C. C., Guynn, R. W., ... Shaw, K. R. (2011). Recent trends in american board of psychiatry and neurology psychiatric subspecialties. Academic Psychiatry, 35(1), 35-39. DOI: 10.1176/appi.ap.35.1.35

Recent trends in american board of psychiatry and neurology psychiatric subspecialties. / Faulkner, Larry R.; Juul, Dorthea; Andrade, Naleen N.; Brooks, Beth Ann; Colenda, Christopher C.; Guynn, Robert W.; Mrazek, David A.; Reus, Victor I.; Schneidman, Barbara S.; Shaw, Kailie R.

In: Academic Psychiatry, Vol. 35, No. 1, 01.01.2011, p. 35-39.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Faulkner, LR, Juul, D, Andrade, NN, Brooks, BA, Colenda, CC, Guynn, RW, Mrazek, DA, Reus, VI, Schneidman, BS & Shaw, KR 2011, 'Recent trends in american board of psychiatry and neurology psychiatric subspecialties' Academic Psychiatry, vol 35, no. 1, pp. 35-39. DOI: 10.1176/appi.ap.35.1.35
Faulkner LR, Juul D, Andrade NN, Brooks BA, Colenda CC, Guynn RW et al. Recent trends in american board of psychiatry and neurology psychiatric subspecialties. Academic Psychiatry. 2011 Jan 1;35(1):35-39. Available from, DOI: 10.1176/appi.ap.35.1.35

Faulkner, Larry R.; Juul, Dorthea; Andrade, Naleen N.; Brooks, Beth Ann; Colenda, Christopher C.; Guynn, Robert W.; Mrazek, David A.; Reus, Victor I.; Schneidman, Barbara S.; Shaw, Kailie R. / Recent trends in american board of psychiatry and neurology psychiatric subspecialties.

In: Academic Psychiatry, Vol. 35, No. 1, 01.01.2011, p. 35-39.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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